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AVANT-GARDENING: CREATIVE ORGANIC GARDENING

Welcome !  " You Can Grow "


VIRTUAL PHOTO TOUR I

Formal Tea Gardens; Main Gardens
Hay Bale Wall; Vegetables, Herbs, and Flowers

...one picture is worth 1000 words...



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Virtual Photo Tour photos are copyrighted (c) by Frank and Vicky Giannangelo.
For permission to print or use any photos please contact us.


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The photos below are of gardens we created in New Mexico from 1997 to May 2010.


FORMAL TEA GARDEN


The Formal Tea Garden was a part of a series of organic sustainable gardens nestled within a stucco hay bale wall containing three patios for private teas, and were constructed from 1997-2005.

formal garden gategarden paths in the formal garden

      Tea Garden Entrance                                  Garden Path        

a raised rock bed in the formal gardenback gate to the labyrinth

     Rock Raised Bed                             Gate to Labyrinth

tea garden in the formal gardenOne of the patios in the formal garden

Tea Garden                               Tea Patio

tripple trellis pond triangle bed and pond

Triple Trellis Pond                              Triangle Bed & Pond

hop vines on trellis in the formal gardenrain on raised bed pond in formal garden

Hop Vines                                  Rain on Pond

goldfish in the pond in the formal gardenpond fountain in the formal garden

Goldfish                                            Pond Fountain

rockwalls in the formal gardenwelcome sign imbedded in rockwall at entrance of the formal garden

Rock Steps                                        Triangle Bed

green frog in greenhouse pondsunset reflection in pond in the formal garden

Green Frog                                    Sunset Reflection

baby spadefoot toads in pond in formal gardena hop flower

Baby Toadlings in pond                                   Hop Flower






VEGETABLE GARDENS

Organic gardening in New Mexico was a real challenge, because of the altitude (7300'), an arid desert environment, and harsh spring winds. The main gardens were used for growing organic produce for the Ramah farmers market from 1998-2005. These gardens are now returning to their natural state, which in New Mexico does not take long!

“Basic to an integrated life is a dominant ideal. To plow a straight row one must keep his eye on the goal rather than the plow.”
J.M. Price


The first three photos depict the state of the land before we started the main organic garden. The rest of the photos are a series from the beginning, to the gardens as they were in 2005.

prickly pear native to new mexico on the north slopewild new mexico primroses growing on the northslope

Prickly Pear                                      Wild Primroses


Native Shrubs                                    Beginning the Garden

Garden Entrance                                          View North


April Garden                                          Garden Pond


June Garden                                      July Garden


Garden Flowers                                    August Garden






HAY BALE WALL

“All that I have accomplished or expect or hope to accomplish, has been and will be by that plodding, patient, persevering process of accretion which builds by the ant-hill, particle by particle, thought by thought, fact by fact.”

Elihu Burritt

In the summer of 2002 we started a hay bale wall around the house in order to enclose the yard gardens. Because the climate is so severe, we wanted to create a "micro-climate", which would be warmer from the reflected heat of the wall, and provide wind protection.

Within this wall were two pools, four sets of trellises, and rock lined raised beds around native Pinon trees interplanted with perennial flowers and herbs. The raised rock beds were also planted with artichokes, herbs, vegetables, and flowers. The temperature within these walls was 10 degrees warmer than the main garden.




Foundation                                    Foundation Forms


Foundation Corner                                   Stacked Hay Corner


Stacking the Bales                                     Cemented Corner


Cement over Lath                                  Cemented Entrance


Metal Gate




VEGETABLES, HERBS, AND FLOWERS


“Nature will bear the closest inspection. She invites us to lay our eye level with her smallest leaf, and take an insect's view of its plain.”
Henry David Thoreau


The quality of the food that was grown in these gardens was unbelievable - we think it was the altitude (7300 feet) and the warm temperatures during the summer months (around 85 with afternoon clouds and thundershowers during July and August). Food grews so fast that cabbage melted in your mouth it was so tender.

There were no wire worms, slugs, or pests, which were unrelenting in our pacific northwest gardens. There were a few grubs, but they didn't seem to do any damage. Once in awhile there was a grasshopper explosion, but they were easily controlled by using Semispore Grasshopper Biologicals.

We placed window screen all around the perimeter of the garden outside of the chicken wire, which kept the baby grasshoppers out. Aphids were rare, probably because of the dry heat and low humidity. Gophers were kept at bay by an diging and leaving open a "gopher trench" 3 feet deep all around the edge of the garden. (As they tunneled they broke through the side, and upon seeing light, turned and went back.)

The soil was tested and balanced every spring and fall, and became sustainable over time by regularly adding our own compost layered with the garden soil.




Chamomile                                          Chive Blossoms


Long Spur Columbine                                                  Radicchio


Purple Cauliflower                                    Tomato blossom


Green Tomatoes                                       Curly Endive


English Thyme                                       Rosemary Flower


Pink Cosmos






Website designed and maintained by Vicky Giannangelo
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Created by Frank and Vicky Giannangelo, copyright (c) 2001-2013


Home Page    About Us    Mossy Knoll Garden/San Juan Island    Botany Basics    "You Can Grow!" Workshops    Composting    Soil Building
Hardiness Zone Map   WebRings    "You Can Grow" CD's   "Tid-Bytes" Insights   Garden Pests & Organic Controls
Biodiversity and Genetic Engineering    New Mexico    Companion & Intensive Planting     Permaculture    Labyrinths
Seed Starting Guide    Creative Garden Design    The Greenzbox    Culinary Herb Gardens    Xeriscape
"Growing with the Seasons"    Photo Tour I    Photo Tour II    Photo Tour III    Photo Tour IV    Photo Tour V
Organic Products    Gardening Books   Gardening Supplies     Recommend This Site    Resources

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